Glendale’s historic buildings beautify our city. They also teach us about important people and events in Glendale’s history, and how our community has developed over time. By educating us about the past, they help us prepare for the future.

I joined The Glendale Historical Society within a few months of moving here. Over the years, I have written numerous letters to City Council and spoken at several public hearings against developer proposals to demolish historic resources. I also spoke in favor of strengthening the City’s Historic Preservation Ordinance. I supported the creation of the Niodrara Drive Historic District, which I am proud to call home. Historic districts allow residents to preserve the character that drew them to an area in the first place.

None of this means that we cannot build; just that we must have smarter development, rather than development for its own sake.

Glendale has a preservation ordinance and guidelines for historic properties, and the California Environmental Act provides robust protections for historic resources. But the City does not always comply with them. Residents are constantly fighting to make sure that the law is followed and that historic resources are not damaged or demolished without proper review. It’s the job of the City, not residents, to police these matters.

I will work hard to ensure that Glendale shows greater respect for its historical heritage and that it preserves or adaptively reuses the relatively few historic buildings that remain to tell our story.